NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Who Are The Confederate Men Memorialized With Statues?

Corrected on August 18, 2017

A previous photo caption incorrectly said that the mayor of Jacksonville. Fla., had called for Confederate monuments to be removed from public property. It was City Council President Anna Lopez Brosche who made this request. Additionally, a previous photo credit incorrectly spelled photographer Mathew Brady's first name as Matthew.

Iconic Plague Images Are Often Not What They Seem

Corrected on August 18, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly listed the order in which NPR ran mislabeled photos in a June story about the plague. The first picture was from a Swiss Bible; it was replaced with one from an Italian document.

UNICEF Picks YouTube Star As Ambassador

Corrected on August 17, 2017

A previous version of this story misquoted Ginny Simmons. We've changed the quote from "It would be her" to "I would bet on her."

Previously corrected on Aug. 16: An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to the NoVo Foundation as the NoVa Foundation.

Latin Roots: Javiera Mena

Corrected on August 17, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to Augusto Pinochet as a Cuban dictator. He was a Chilean dictator.

Morning Edition

How Police Can Keep The Peace During Tense Protests

Corrected on August 16, 2017

In an earlier version of this report, it was mistakenly said that people on both sides of the violence in Charlottesville were seen openly carrying automatic weapons. In fact, reports so far indicate that almost all of those seen carrying guns were among the white supremacists there that day, and that they were not automatic weapons.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Inside Wrigley Field, The Scorekeepers Stay True To Baseball's Beginnings

Corrected on August 14, 2017

In the audio version of this story, as in a previous Web version, we report that just two Major League Baseball stadiums have manual scoreboards. We should have noted that just two stadiums — Wrigley Field and Fenway Park — have vintage manual scoreboards. Several other modern stadiums have small manual scoreboards.

All Things Considered

Russian Cyberattack Targeted Elections Vendor Tied To Voting Day Disruptions

Corrected on August 11, 2017

In the audio of this story, as well as an earlier Web version, we report that Susan Greenhalgh "knew that in September, the FBI had warned Florida election officials that Russians had tried to hack one of their vendor's computers." Greenhalgh's information was based on several news reports last fall and a discussion she had with one of the local election officials who participated in the call with the FBI. A spokeswoman for the Florida Department of State, which manages elections in the state, says there was "an informational call with the FBI ... where they alerted officials for the need to maintain security measures, but there was no indication of a Florida-specific issue."

5 Big Unanswered Questions About The Russia Investigations

Corrected on August 10, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly attributed a quote about counter-messaging Russian propaganda. The original statement was issued jointly by Sens. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Chris Murphy, D-Conn.

Wilco, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2017

Corrected on August 10, 2017

An earlier version of this story stated that Wilco began the concert with a song from its 2016 album, Schmilco. "Random Name Generator" was, in fact, on Wilco's 2015 album, Star Wars.

Morning Edition

Senators Plan Bipartisan Hearings On Health Care

Corrected on August 9, 2017

In this report, we mistakenly say that the insurance industry has made $78 million in contributions to political campaigns so far this year. In fact, the $78 million has been spent on lobbying, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Jeff Flake Has Taken On Trump And The GOP, But Will It Matter?

Corrected on August 8, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that an order by the governor of Missouri expelling Mormons from the state was signed in 1938. It was signed in 1838. Also, the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks took place in 2001, not 2011.

With His Back Against The Wall, Trump Again Turns To Grievance Politics

Corrected on August 8, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said President Trump's approval had slipped 17 points among independents since February. His approval dropped 9 points, part of a 17-point swing.

Previously corrected on Aug. 5: A version of this story incorrectly said Donald Trump asked black voters: "What the hell do you have to lose?" at a Wisconsin rally. He actually said this at a Michigan event.

Morning Edition

Looking Back On Bank Of America's Countrywide Debacle

Corrected on August 8, 2017

In the introduction to this report, we mistakenly say Bank of America bought Countrywide Financial for $40 billion. In fact, BoA paid $4 billion for Countrywide. As of early 2013, when this story was broadcast, BoA had paid about $40 billion in legal costs related to earlier claims made against Countrywide.

Bandcamp Holds Fundraiser For Transgender Law Center

Corrected on August 4, 2017

A previous version of this story said that a fundraiser organized by Bandcamp in January raised $1 million for the ACLU. That fundraiser generated $1 million in sales, from which the site donated its share of the proceeds to the ACLU.

Woman Who Urged Boyfriend To Commit Suicide Must Serve 15 Months In Prison

Corrected on August 4, 2017

A previous version of this story cited The Associated Press as saying that prosecutors were seeking a sentence of 20 years. The news service has since corrected that to seven to 12 years. In addition, a previous version referred to an NPR article from July. That story ran in June.

All Things Considered

Vice President Pence Reassures Allies In Eastern Europe

Corrected on August 3, 2017

In this report, Montenegro is included among countries said to have been within the Soviet sphere of influence during the Cold War. It was not. As part of Yugoslavia, Montenegro was outside the Soviet sphere.

New Fears For Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Corrected on August 2, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Public Service Loan Forgiveness was introduced under the Obama administration. In fact, it began in 2007.

A College President On Her School's Worst Year Ever

Corrected on August 2, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Harvey Mudd College being located in Silicon Valley. It is in Claremont, Calif. Additionally, we incorrectly stated that Wabash College researchers, for their report, chose to overrepresent students and faculty who were challenged; Harvey Mudd faculty made that decision.

All Things Considered

What's Behind The Success Of 'Despacito'?

Corrected on August 2, 2017

In an earlier version of this Web story, Rocio Guerrero was mistakenly referred to as "he." Guerrero is a woman.

First Customers Get Tesla Model 3 Electric Cars

Corrected on August 1, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said Ford's truck division turned 100 two days before Elon Musk's presentation. Musk spoke just one day after the anniversary.

Laurene Powell Jobs To Buy Stake In 'The Atlantic'

Corrected on July 28, 2017

A previous version of the headline and story incorrectly said Laurene Powell Jobs is buying a stake in Atlantic Media. In fact, she is buying a stake in only part of that company, The Atlantic magazine and its affiliated business.

All Things Considered

Life In Yemen's Taiz: A City Under Siege

Corrected on July 28, 2017

During this conversation, we say Yemen shares a border with only one other country, Saudi Arabia. In fact, Yemen also borders Oman.

Morning Edition

What's It Like To Be A Historian At This Political Time? 'Every Day Is Christmas'

Corrected on July 28, 2017

During this conversation, it's said that the household income for a family of four in the U.S. is around $57,000. That's incorrect. The figure that should have been cited is the median household income, which isn't based on the number of people in a home. In 2015, that figure was $55,775.

Why Are Undocumented Immigrants Smuggled By Truck?

Corrected on July 27, 2017

A previous version of this story misspelled James Matthew Bradley Jr.'s middle name as Mathew. Additionally, a previous version omitted Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera's first name.

All Things Considered

Trump Says Transgender People Will Be Banned From Military

Corrected on July 27, 2017

Estimates about the number of transgender people in the military range from 2,000 people to more than 15,000, depending on the study. The numbers cited in this story are from one Rand Corp. paper about transgender troops and reflect the high end of its estimated range of more than 6,000 people on active duty.

All Things Considered

After Assault, Some Campuses Focus On Healing Over Punishment

Corrected on July 27, 2017

This story refers to Emma Sulkowicz as a survivor of sexual assault, as she considers herself to be. The accused in her case was found not responsible by a campus adjudication process.

All Things Considered

After Supreme Court Decision, People Race To Trademark Racially Offensive Words

Corrected on July 27, 2017

In this report, we say that a few days after Curtis Bordenave filed an application to register "Nigga" as a trademark, Steve Maynard's Snowflake Enterprises LLC applied to do the same thing. In fact, Bordenave's first application to trademark the word was filed on June 19, 2017, the day of the Supreme Court decision. Later that same day, Maynard's Snowflake Enterprises filed an application. Bordenave filed a second application to register "Nigga" on June 19. Then on June 27, Maynard's Snowflake Enterprises filed two more applications to register the word.

What Is The 'Regular Order' John McCain Longs To Return To On Health Care?

Corrected on July 26, 2017

This story has been clarified to note that Democrats used reconciliation in 2010 to pass additional parts of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, rather than to pass the full law. The bulk of the law, passed in 2009, was passed via "regular order," though that passage was closely linked to the subsequent amendments.

The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women

Corrected on July 25, 2017

The title of Aretha Franklin's 1967 album is I Never Loved a Man The Way I Love You, not "I Never Loved a Man The Way I Loved You."

Latino USA

One Of The Fathers Of Black History Was Afro-Puerto Rican

Corrected on July 25, 2017

A previous headline on this page said Arturo Schomburg was the "father of black of history." In fact, there were others who played important roles in the collection of black history.

Ask Me Another

For The Win

Corrected on July 25, 2017

In this episode, we describe Ginuwine as a rapper. We should have described him as an R&B artist.

The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women

Corrected on July 24, 2017

In an earlier version of this report, we said Ansley Dunbar was a member of Grace Jones' rhythm section on Nightclubbing. In fact, it was drummer Sly Dunbar.

All Things Considered

With New Security Measures, Tensions Remain High In Jerusalem's Old City

Corrected on July 23, 2017

An earlier version of the teaser said an attack at a Jerusalem holy site left six Palestinians and Israelis dead, leading Israel to install metal detectors. In fact, three attackers killed two Israeli police officers before being shot and killed by Israeli forces in that July 14 incident.

All Things Considered

The Week In Politics: Spicer Is Out; Scaramucci Is In

Corrected on July 23, 2017

We mistakenly say that Jared Kushner is scheduled to speak to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. In fact, he is set to talk to the Senate Intelligence Committee that day.

Morning Edition

Trump Administration Considers End To Citizenship For Military Service Program

Corrected on July 20, 2017

We mistakenly say that it takes eight years for a member of the armed services who is in the MAVNI program to get U.S. citizenship. In fact, under the program's fast track to citizenship, officials say, the process can sometimes take weeks, months or years — but not eight years. A previous Web introduction had the same incorrect information.

Morning Edition

Morning News Brief: Trump Meets Putin Again; Protests At Jerusalem Holy Site

Corrected on July 19, 2017

During the Up First podcast, a holy site in Jerusalem's Old City — known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the Temple Mount — is described as being shared by Jews and Muslims. It is more accurate to say the site is revered by Jews and Muslims.

All Things Considered

Trump Administration Moves To Defund Teen Pregnancy Research Programs

Corrected on July 19, 2017

In the introduction to this story, the Reveal podcast and radio program is said to be from the Center for Investigative Reporting. In fact, Reveal is a co-production of the center and Public Radio Exchange.

Previously posted July 18: In this report, we mistakenly refer to Valerie Huber as an assistant secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services. In fact, she is chief of staff at the department's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

All Things Considered

Students Compete In First-Ever International High School Robotics Competition

Corrected on July 18, 2017

In the audio, our introduction to this piece describes this event as "the first-ever international robotics competition." We should have been more specific. Organizers say this event is the first global robotics competition specifically for high school students. There have been other robotics competitions with teams from multiple countries.

Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

Corrected on July 18, 2017

Lindsay Page was identified in this podcast as an education researcher at Harvard. While she was indeed at Harvard at the time we conducted our interview with her, she is now at the University of Pittsburgh. We regret the error.

Weekend Edition Sunday

'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs

Corrected on July 18, 2017

During this conversation, researcher Jack Gilbert mistakenly says a study of more than 300,000 children showed that children whose parents licked their pacifiers developed fewer allergies and other health problems. In fact, while the work was part of a study involving more than 300,000 children, only 184 of them were part of the research involving pacifiers.

All Things Considered

'Doctor Who' Is A Woman: Jodie Whittaker Chosen To Play Lead In British Sci-Fi Series

Corrected on July 17, 2017

An earlier web introduction to this story incorrectly said Jodie Whittaker would be the 13th actor to play Doctor Who. She'll be portraying the 13th incarnation of the character.

Update July 18, 2017: And an earlier version of this correction left one "t" out of Jodie Whittaker's last name.

All Things Considered

This 10-Pound Keyboard From The 1980s Is Making A Comeback

Corrected on July 17, 2017

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said the original keyboards would have cost around $1,700 in today's market. The inflation-adjusted cost was around $600.

All Things Considered

Residents Of East Austin, Once A Bustling Black Enclave, Make A Suburban Exodus

Corrected on July 17, 2017

In this report, professor Eric Tang says a store once called the Hillside Pharmacy is now a restaurant called Hillside Farmacy. In fact, while the business that was there before was known to local residents as the Hillside pharmacy, its name was Hillside Drugstore.

All Things Considered

All Hail The Presidential Also-Rans

Corrected on July 15, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly gave Thomas Dewey's last name as Dewer.

Morning Edition

George W. Bush And Bill Clinton Talk Leadership In Dallas

Corrected on July 14, 2017

In an earlier introduction to this report, we mistakenly said it was former President Obama who was onstage with former President George W. Bush. As the report makes clear, it was former President Clinton who was there.

All Things Considered

Fort Drum Shooting Raises Questions About Army Recruitment Process

Corrected on July 14, 2017

In this report, it's said that short of a murder conviction, recruiters will consider people who have criminal records. It's more accurate to say that at this time, recruiters are rarely considering people with felony arrests or convictions on their records.

Morning Edition

Republicans Remain Divided Over Health Care Plan

Corrected on July 14, 2017

Republican Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada has criticized the Senate health care bill's impact on Medicaid in Nevada, not Medicare as is said in this report.

Collecting LGBT Census Data Is 'Essential' To Federal Agency, Document Shows

Corrected on July 14, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly said a letter from the Census Bureau described Justice Department officials contacting the bureau about the "appropriateness" of sexual orientation and gender identity topics. The letter was in fact from the Commerce Department, which oversees the bureau.

All Things Considered

American Cruise Companies Stand To Benefit From U.S. Changes To Cuba Policy

Corrected on July 11, 2017

This report says that the Trump administration's new Cuba policy largely ends individual travel. Government regulations won't be published until later this summer, but it is expected that individual travel will still be allowed for educational credit and other purposes outlined in 11 categories by the Treasury Department.

All Things Considered

Decision Due On Whether To Lift Sanctions On Sudan

Corrected on July 11, 2017

A previous headline stated that the Trump administration will lift sanctions imposed on Sudan. The headline has been corrected because a final decision has not yet been made.

Weekend Edition Sunday

While Corals Die Along The Great Barrier Reef, Humans Struggle To Adjust

Corrected on July 11, 2017

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, this story incorrectly states that the distance from the coast of Port Douglas, Australia, to the outer reef is nearly 100 miles. The correct distance is 30 miles.

Corrected on July 9:

In a previous version of this story, Terry Hughes of the James Cook University's Coral Reef Center was erroneously identified as Jon Brodie.

All Things Considered

Are All Soaps Created Equal?

Corrected on July 11, 2017

A previous version of this report said the CBC's studio is in Colona, British Columbia. That was a misspelling of the city's name. It is Kelowna.

Amelia Earhart's Travel Menu Relied On 3 Rules And People's Generosity

Corrected on July 9, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified Earhart's plane as a Lockhart Electra. It was actually a Lockheed Electra. In addition, a previous version said Earhart's 1932 solo flight ended in Ireland. She landed in Northern Ireland. And we incorrectly quoted Earhart as saying in a 1930s interview that her in-flight menu must be enough to "prevent fatigue but not enough to prevent drowsiness"; she actually said it must not be enough to "induce drowsiness."

In A First, Connecticut's Animals Get Advocates In The Courtroom

Corrected on July 7, 2017

A previous version of this story referred to a donation to the Harvard Law School from Jeff C. Thomas. The school's website refers to him as Charles Thomas.

Previously corrected June 6, 2017: A previous version of this story misspelled a reference to Taylor Hansen's last name as Hanson.

Fresh Air

Searching For A Summer Escape? These 6 Books Will Carry You Away

Corrected on July 7, 2017

The audio of this story incorrectly states that 1878 was the last time a total solar eclipse crossed North America, and that the upcoming Aug. 21 eclipse will cross the continental United States. In fact, the last time a total solar eclipse crossed North America was in 1918, and the Aug. 21 eclipse will be crossing the contiguous U.S. In 1878, an eclipse crossed the nation from the Montana territory to Texas.

Bittersweet Little Rock And Roller

Corrected on July 7, 2017

An earlier version of this article included a reversed image of Chuck Berry playing guitar. The photo was provided by Getty Images.

Hobby Lobby To Forfeit Smuggled Iraqi Antiquities

Corrected on July 6, 2017

A previous version of this post indicated that the artifacts were shipped to Hobby Lobby from Iraq through other countries. In fact, according to the Justice Department, the items were already in the UAE when Hobby Lobby agreed to purchase them.

Congress Casts A Suspicious Eye On Russia's Kaspersky Lab

Corrected on July 6, 2017

A previous version of this story said: Best Buy loads the laptop computers it sells with Kaspersky Lab software. Best Buy clarifies: Kaspersky Lab software is one of several anti-virus products it loads at the customer's discretion.

Morning Edition

Italy Threatens To Close Its Ports Over Spike In Migrant Arrivals

Corrected on July 5, 2017

Slovakia is among a small number of European nations that in the past declined to accept migrants, and it is challenging the EU's quota system. But it has recently allowed in a small number of migrants.

Dozens Of States Resist Trump Administration Voter Initiative

Corrected on July 5, 2017

A previous headline stated dozens of states have rejected the administration's voter initiative. While most states have resisted the initiative, more than a dozen have rejected it. Additionally, we incorrectly said Kris Kobach was the former Kansas secretary of state. He currently holds that position.

Previously posted July 3: A previous update to this story incorrectly said that the number of states refusing to fully comply had doubled as of Saturday.

Morning Edition

How Hong Kong's Banks Turned Chinese

Corrected on July 5, 2017

The audio version of this story states that Weiqi Zhu believes many Hong Kongers are like servants, compared with 20 years ago. A previous Web version of this story stated the same. In fact, Zhu said Hong Kongers now focus more on serving clients than they did before the rise of competition from well-trained mainland Chinese.

Morning Edition

California's Near-Record Snowpack Is Melting Into Raging Rivers

Corrected on July 5, 2017

This story refers to Mount Whitney as the highest point in the continental United States. At more than 14,500 feet, its summit is the highest point in the contiguous U.S. But Alaska's Denali, until recently called Mount McKinley, is the highest peak in North America and therefore the highest in the continental U.S.

Morning Edition

Correction: Canadian Woman Didn't Miss Out On Banana Bread

Corrected on June 30, 2017

We got fooled. Earlier, we told Morning Edition listeners that a woman in Canada had died before she could turn her refrigerator full of bananas into banana bread. It turns out that story was from a satirical website.

Morning Edition

JAY-Z Bares His Soul On '4:44'

Corrected on June 30, 2017

A previous Web version of this story referred to the Knowles-Carters as a family of four. The arrival of their twins brings the total to five.

Morning Edition

Former Tennis Player James Blake On Athletes And Activism

Corrected on June 29, 2017

In this report, we incorrectly say that a legal fellowship to investigate civilian complaints will be established within the New York City Police Department. It will, in fact, be a community outreach fellowship run by the city's Civilian Complaint Review Board.

Anita Pallenberg Was No Simple Muse

Corrected on June 29, 2017

This article previously misstated the publication year of Faithfull, Marianne Faithfull's autobiography, as being 2010. It was 1994.

Morning Edition

Desert Aid Camp Turning Away Migrants Following Border Patrol Raid

Corrected on June 28, 2017

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly state that the Tucson sector of the Border Patrol is hiring 4,000 new agents. In fact, the Border Patrol plans to hire more than 4,000 new agents nationally, with many of those expected to go to the Tucson sector.

Fresh Air

'What Would You Do?' Author Wants To Stop Sensationalizing The Donner Party

Corrected on June 27, 2017

In the audio of this story, the guest and host incorrectly identify an American explorer as James Clyburn. His name was James Clyman. In the audio the host also incorrectly identifies a mountain range in the Western U.S. as the Sierra Madre. It is the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

From Birth To Death, Medicaid Affects The Lives Of Millions

Corrected on June 27, 2017

A previous version of the graphic in this story incorrectly said adults make up the largest share of Medicaid enrollees. Children and adults combined make up the largest share. Seniors and people with disabilities account for the rest of the enrollees.

Considering Breast-Feeding? This Guide Can Help

Corrected on June 27, 2017

An earlier version of this story neglected to mention that because honey can contain botulism spores, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that honey not be given to children who are under 12 months of age.

Invisibilia

True You

Corrected on June 27, 2017

In a previous version of this podcast, we incorrectly referred to Lord Birthday's upcoming book as How to Be Normal at Social Events. The correct title is How to Appear Normal at Social Events.

Invisibilia

Future Self

Corrected on June 27, 2017

A previous version of this podcast identified North Port as being a small town on the east coast of Florida. It is on the southwest coast.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Alaska's 40 Years Of Oil Riches Almost Never Was

Corrected on June 24, 2017

A previous version of the digital story incorrectly noted the amount of oil spilled into Price William Sound in the 1989 wreck of the Exxon Valdez oil tanker. It was 11 million gallons spilled.

Future Humans: How Many Of Us Will There Be?

Corrected on June 23, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Africa and Europe have a combined population of about 1 billion. In fact, the continents have a total of about 2 billion people.

Morning Edition

Russia Aims To Meddle In State Elections, Sen. King Says

Corrected on June 21, 2017

Earlier audio incorrectly linked new sanctions to Russian attempts to meddle in the American election. They are actually related to Russian actions in Ukraine. In addition, the Web description incorrectly said the interview was conducted by Steve Inskeep. It was done by David Greene.

These Dinner Parties Serve Up A Simple Message: Refugees Welcome

Corrected on June 21, 2017

In a previous version of this story, we said a New York City dinner helped a Ghanaian refugee get a fellowship. The dinner actually helped a Yemeni refugee get a scholarship. We also said that the dinner helped connect two people who ended up launching a creative agency, when in fact they are actually working on starting a pop-up restaurant.

Weekend Edition Sunday

On Political Rhetoric And Political Violence

Corrected on June 20, 2017

During this conversation, it's said that an armed man who entered a Washington, D.C., restaurant was "targeting liberals." In fact, he went there to "self-investigate" baseless Internet rumors.

A Band Apart

Corrected on June 20, 2017

A previous version of this story implied that Matt Tong moved to New York after joining Algiers. He has lived there since 2010.

Morning Edition

How To Deal With North Korea? Some Options Are Worse Than Others

Corrected on June 19, 2017

In this report, it's said that North Korea has continued to develop and test nuclear weapons despite warnings from the Trump administration. While North Korea is believed to still be developing nuclear weapons, it has not tested any since President Trump took office.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Small Indiana Nonprofit Falls Victim To Ransom Cyberattack

Corrected on June 19, 2017

This story has been edited to add that Cancer Services of East Central Indiana – Little Red Door is separate from the Little Red Door Cancer Agency in Indianapolis, which was not the target of a cyberattack.

This Week, Will The Russia Story Actually Be About Russia?

Corrected on June 17, 2017

A previous version of this story quoted congressional testimony suggesting that state election systems have not yet been designated as critical infrastructure by the Department of Homeland Security. In fact, that designation was made by DHS on Jan. 6, 2017.

All Things Considered

The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley

Corrected on June 16, 2017

A previous version of this story said that Freada Kapor Klein and Mitch Kapor became a couple after his first marriage fell apart, and that he had a son. In fact, it was after his second marriage fell apart, and he had a son and a daughter.

Morning Edition

Gene Simmons Wants To Trademark Hand Gesture

Corrected on June 15, 2017

In the audio, as in a previous headline and Web summary, we say Gene Simmons is looking to patent a hand sign. He wants to trademark it.

All Things Considered

The Dallas Street Choir Makes Historic Carnegie Hall Debut

Corrected on June 15, 2017

In the audio, as in an earlier Web version of this story, the opera by composer Jake Heggie that was being performed at the Winspear Opera House is reported to have been Moby Dick. In fact, it was Heggie's opera Great Scott.

All Things Considered

Democratic Lawmakers Say Trump Is Violating The Constitution

Corrected on June 14, 2017

An earlier version of this broadcast story said the lawsuit grew out of research by the Congressional Accountability Council. The organization is the Constitutional Accountability Council.

Morning Edition

A Pesticide, A Pigweed And A Farmer's Murder

Corrected on June 14, 2017

In a previous Web summary, we mistakenly said that a farmer had misused a Monsanto pesticide. The misused pesticide was not a Monsanto product.

Fresh Air

'Hue 1968' Revisits An American 'Turning Point' In The War In Vietnam

Corrected on June 13, 2017

In the version of this report that was broadcast, we misidentify the CBS correspondent in the clip of the battlefield interview during the Battle of Hue as Don Webster speaking to Mark Bowden. The reporter was CBS correspondent John Laurence, and he was speaking with Lt. Col. Ernest Cheatham.

Japan's Emperor Will Be Permitted To Abdicate

Corrected on June 12, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that according to legend the goddess Amaterasu was Japan's first monarch. The first emperor according to legend was a direct descendant of the goddess.

'Illicit Cohabitation': Listen To 6 Stunning Moments From Loving V. Virginia

Corrected on June 12, 2017

One sentence in a previous version of this story incorrectly said the Supreme Court ruling declared interracial marriage unconstitutional. In fact, as the rest of the story made clear, the ruling declared prohibitions on interracial marriage unconstitutional. Also, Philip Hirschkop's first name was misspelled as Phillip.

Trump's Lawyer Fires Back After Comey Testimony

Corrected on June 8, 2017

An earlier version of this story mischaracterized a memo that Comey said he asked a friend to leak to a reporter. The memo described Comey's Oval Office meeting with the president on Feb. 14, not his private dinner with the president on Jan. 27.

At Versailles Palace, An American Looks For Clues To Family History

Corrected on June 8, 2017

In a previous version of this story, relying on information from Maureen Hargrave, we incorrectly referred to Pearlie Hargrave as Elsie Hargrave. Maureen Hargrave referred incorrectly to her aunt as Elsie in a quotation.

Previously posted April 9: A previous version of this story incorrectly noted the lineage and relationship between Louis XIV and Louis XVI. Louis XIV was the great-great-grandfather of Louis XVI, and Louis XVI's grandfather was Louis XV.

All Things Considered

Russia Investigation Elevates Jared Kushner's Previously Low Profile

Corrected on June 5, 2017

This story states that Jared Kushner "pushed" his father-in-law — President Trump — to fire FBI Director James Comey. In fact, Kushner supported the firing but did not push for it, according to a person familiar with the situation.

So What Exactly Is In The Paris Climate Accord?

Corrected on June 3, 2017

A correction appended to this story was, in fact, incorrect. The difference between 2 degrees Celsius is indeed 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit as it was originally written.

All Things Considered

House Poised To Roll Back Dodd-Frank Financial Reform

Corrected on June 2, 2017

This piece originally stated that the Financial CHOICE Act would eliminate caps on fees that retailers are charged for debit card transactions, but lawmakers have removed that provision from the original bill.

Morning Edition

The Science Of Identifying Soldier Remains

Corrected on May 30, 2017

In the version of this report that was broadcast, we say that Lt. Bussa was killed in action on Guadalcanal. Bussa fought there, but died later in the war during the battle of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands.

Weekend Edition Saturday

In A Lost Concert, Jaco Pastorius Sounded The Rhythm Of The City

Corrected on May 28, 2017

In the audio version of this story, The Chicken was introduced as a composition by Jaco Pastorius — it was actually written by Alfred "Pee Wee" Ellis.

Additionally, the audio version of this story incorrectly places the incident that led to Pastorius' death in Miami — in fact, that encounter happened in Wilton Manors, Fla. The same error in the digital version of this story has been corrected.

All Things Considered

Sponsors Back Out Of NYC Puerto Rican Day Parade Over Honoree

Corrected on May 26, 2017

During this conversation, it was incorrectly said that FALN (Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional) means "national forces for national liberation." In fact, it means "armed forces of national liberation."

Yo-Ho-Hum: Johnny Depp Returns For More 'Pirates'

Corrected on May 26, 2017

A previous version of this story gave the incorrect time span between Rocky and Creed. The movies came out not 29 but 39 years apart. Therefore, the correct time span between the first and latest Pirates of the Caribbean movies is about one-third of that.

All Things Considered

How Policing Has Changed For 3 Generations Of Black Police Officers

Corrected on May 26, 2017

A caption in a previous version of this story incorrectly identified members of the White family. They are pictured from left to right: Clarence Sr., Clarence Jr., Rodney Sr., Keith, LeEtta, Rodney Jr., Christopher and Thomas White. In addition, Christopher White's name was misspelled in the same caption.

Black Ministry Students At Duke Say They Face Unequal Treatment And Racism

Corrected on May 26, 2017

A previous version of this story said that the Duke Divinity School's curriculum does not include black religion traditions. In fact, according to school officials, students in the master's of divinity program must take at least one course that centers on African-American church traditions. The story also said that teaching assistants are not trained in classroom management. In fact, according to school officials, the assistants are trained in classroom management and handling biases.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

Corrected on May 25, 2017

An earlier version of this report incorrectly said that more than half of the increase in uninsured would come from reduced Medicare enrollment. In fact, it would come from a reduction in Medicaid enrollment. Additionally, we incorrectly said Medicaid reductions in the health care bill would result in $884 billion in savings. The cuts will result in $834 billion in savings.

Episode 773: Slot Flaw Scofflaws

Corrected on May 25, 2017

An earlier version of this story implied that all email is encrypted. Only some email is encrypted end-to-end by default.

Morning Edition

Seattle Mom Sues Trump To Stop Travel Ban And Bring Her Son Home

Corrected on May 24, 2017

On Monday, the federal judge hearing Ali v. Trump put the case on hold while the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals considers a similar challenge to President Trump's executive order that was brought by the state of Hawaii.

Morning Edition

Former FBI Director To Lead Probe Of Russian Meddling

Corrected on May 20, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Robert Mueller was James Comey's boss back when Mueller served as FBI director and Comey served as deputy attorney general. The attorney general heads the Department of Justice. The FBI director does not oversee the Department of Justice, the attorney general or the deputy attorney general.

The News Can't Stop, Won't Stop — All This Happened This Week

Corrected on May 19, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy as the President's Trophy. Additionally, we incorrectly quoted Chemi Shalev's remarks. He said, regarding damage to Israeli intelligence assets, that there was "anger, even," not "angry, then."

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz To Leave Office At The End Of June

Corrected on May 18, 2017

A previous version of this story gave incorrect names for the Web domains registered by Jason Chaffetz's campaign. They are JasonChaffetz2028.com and Jason2028.com, not Chaffetz2028.com and JasonForGovernor.com

Who Is Robert Mueller, Special Counsel Overseeing Russia Investigation?

Corrected on May 18, 2017

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said James Comey was confirmed seven years after resigning as deputy attorney general. He was confirmed eight years later. In addition, we previously said Robert Mueller was an assistant U.S. attorney in three offices. He actually served multiple positions in the three U.S. attorneys' offices.

All Things Considered

A Lesser-Known Venus Visits The U.S. In New Botticelli Exhibit

Corrected on May 18, 2017

In this story, David Mirkin incorrectly identifies the shell that Venus is riding as a clamshell. It's actually a scallop shell. We make the same mistake in the audio and had also said the same thing in a previous Web version. Please listen to our on-air correction for more on mollusks.

Morning Edition

For Families With Special Needs, Vouchers Bring Choices, Not Guarantees

Corrected on May 17, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly attribute a quotation to the wrong staff member of The Arc. The speaker was Annie Acosta, the director of fiscal and family support policy, not Shawn Ullman.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Putin Plays Hockey, And Wins, Of Course

Corrected on May 16, 2017

In this story, as in a previous headline, we say Vladimir Putin marked his 64th birthday this week by playing hockey. It was not his birthday. Putin's birthday is in October.

'Seeing People Off' Is A Short, Strange Trip

Corrected on May 11, 2017

A previous version of this review referred to Seeing People Off as Jana Beňová's English-language debut. It is more accurate to say this is her first book to be published in English. It was translated from the Slovak by Janet Livingstone.

All Things Considered

Fact-Checking Republicans' Defense Of The GOP Health Bill

Corrected on May 11, 2017

An earlier version of this story said that under the GOP bill, once people leave the Medicaid rolls they would not be able to return, even if their income declines. In actuality, the bill does not bar their return, but they would probably lose that option because states would receive less funding for Medicaid when people leave the rolls.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Sally Yates Testimony, South Korea Election, 'Frontline' Probe

Corrected on May 9, 2017

In an earlier version of this report, it was said that the cost in tax credits for a government-funded low income housing program is rising 66 percent every year. In fact, the cost in tax credits has gone up 66 percent over a span of 20 years.

Episode 769: Speed Dating For Economists

Corrected on May 9, 2017

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated the economists' market takes place in Chicago each year. It was in Chicago this year but not every year.

All Things Considered

Affordable Housing Program Costs More, Shelters Fewer

Corrected on May 9, 2017

In a previous version of this story, Gonzalo DeRamon's first name was misspelled as Gonzales. Additionally, we said there was no public accounting of the LIHTC program's costs. In fact there is some, although it is minimal. Also, we clarified that the Texas lawsuit, filed by Mike Daniels, wasn't filed in 2015; the case reached the Supreme Court in that year.

All Things Considered

When Elmo And Big Bird Talk To Refugees

Corrected on May 5, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the Arab Network for Early Childhood Development as the Arab Childhood Network for Early Education. Additionally, we previously gave Sherrie Westin an incomplete title. She is the executive vice president, not vice president, for global impact and philanthropy.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Hezbollah Plays Up Efforts To Oppose Israel

Corrected on May 5, 2017

This story incorrectly states that the man who led away a U.N. official was a Hezbollah party official. According to the group, the man was an official with the Lebanese military who accompanied Hezbollah on the media tour.

A Baby With 3 Genetic Parents Seems Healthy, But Questions Remain

Corrected on May 5, 2017

An earlier version of this story referred to a baby conceived using the genes of three people as the world's first three-parent baby. In the past, some children were born using a different method that used material from two eggs. We have added a paragraph explaining that technique.

All Things Considered

Elite Prep Schools Experiment With 'All-Gender' Dorms

Corrected on May 4, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly refer to Kirtland House as Kirkland House.

Previously posted on May 3: In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly refer to Phillips Academy Andover as Phillips Andover Academy.

The Joy Of Science

Corrected on May 3, 2017

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that Titan is 50 billion miles from the Earth. It's actually 746 million miles away.

All Things Considered

In 'The Circle', What We Give Up When We Share Ourselves

Corrected on May 3, 2017

In the audio of this report, as in a previous Web version, we mistakenly attribute the first use of the term "surveillance capitalism" to Dave Eggers. In fact, the term was coined by Harvard professor Shoshana Zuboff in an article published in 2015.

Previously posted on April 29: A previous Web version of this story misidentified the name of the protagonist, using two different versions of her name. The character portrayed by Emma Watson is named Mae, not May.

Can We See Some ID?

Corrected on May 2, 2017

A previous version of this column overstated the role of the Ploughshares Fund in supporting the Iran nuclear deal. The organization's president, Joe Cirincione, says it did not coordinate the Obama administration's messaging on the deal, as the column stated.

Morning Edition

Stabenow To Vote Against Gorsuch, Says Country Needs Mainstream Judges

Corrected on April 28, 2017

During this interview, Sen. Stabenow says that in recent decades only Judge Clarence Thomas did not receive at least 60 votes in the Senate. When a vote was taken in 2006 to end debate over Justice Samuel Alito's nomination, there was a supermajority (72 senators) in favor. But Alito was confirmed by a vote of 58-42.

Yates, Clapper To Testify In Senate Hearing On Russian Election Meddling

Corrected on April 26, 2017

A previous version of this post said Sally Yates and James Clapper will appear before the House Intelligence Committee on May 8. A previous photo caption said the same about Yates. While both Yates and Clapper are set to appear before that committee in an open hearing, it has not yet been scheduled. It is the Senate Judiciary testimony that is scheduled for May 8.

His Teacher Told Him He Wouldn't Go To College, Then He Did

Corrected on April 24, 2017

An earlier version of this story erred in saying a student threw a football at the board in Ronnie Sidney's class. It was a paper football. And this happened when Sidney was in the eighth grade, not ninth. Also, in noting statistics from 2014-2015 on the percentage of black students who left high school, the words "without a regular diploma" were omitted.

Can You Still Have Hope When Life Seems Hopeless?

Corrected on April 23, 2017

A previous version of this story stated that Peter Ventevogel worked for the International Organization of Migration. Ventevogel works for the United Nations Refugee Agency.

Lights Off, Blankets Out: Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight

Corrected on April 22, 2017

A previous photo used in this story that claimed to show meteors passing near the Milky Way has been replaced. The photo used information provided by Getty Images. It has been replaced with a different photo.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Ralph Towner: An Old Hand With A 'Foolish Heart' (And An Unmatched Style)

Corrected on April 22, 2017

The audio story accompanying this piece is incorrect. While Towner was born in Washington state, he lived in Oregon from the age of 5, according to his website. He also attended the University of Oregon, and not the University of Washington. The same errors in a previous version of this digital story have been corrected.

Morning Edition

The Stakes In France's Presidential Election

Corrected on April 21, 2017

Earlier audio versions of this report characterized President Trump's views as being "anti-immigrant" and "anti-Muslim." It is more accurate to say he is seeking to shut off illegal immigration and that he has vowed to fight "radical Islamic terrorism."

Morning Edition

Some VAs Are Dropping Veteran Caregivers From Their Rolls

Corrected on April 21, 2017

A previous version of the graphic on this page mistakenly said that in 2017 there were 133 supported caregivers at the Harry S. Truman Memorial VA facility in Columbia, Mo. In fact, there were 87 supported caregivers there.

Trump's Wiretap Tweets Bring Lawsuit Seeking Proof

Corrected on April 19, 2017

A previous version of this story called American Oversight a watchdog group comprising former Obama administration lawyers. In fact, there are others in the group who were not part of the Obama administration.

Morning Edition

Mike Pesca Makes The Case For James Harden As MVP

Corrected on April 19, 2017

In a previous version of this story, Mike Pesca said that Russell Westbrook averaged double digits this season in points, steals and rebounds. Westbrook did not average double digits in steals. His triple-double was for double-digit averages in points, assists and rebounds.

Big City Escapee Is Living In A Mud Hut — And Loving It

Corrected on April 17, 2017

A previous version of the story incorrectly stated that India's 2011 census recorded 83.3 million people in rural areas and 37.7 million in urban areas. The correct numbers are 833 million in rural areas and 377 million in urban areas.

All Things Considered

In Israel, Muslims Hold 'American Idol'-Style Call-To-Prayer Contest

Corrected on April 17, 2017

The bills under consideration in the Israeli parliament would ban calls to prayer amplified by loudspeakers before 7 a.m. and regulate when calls to prayer may be amplified by loudspeakers at other times, but would not prohibit calls to prayer made without the use of loudspeakers.

All Things Considered

We Asked People What They Know About Taxes. See If You Know The Answers

Corrected on April 17, 2017

A previous version of this story included a true/false question about taxes paid by the richest Americans. The question could be interpreted in different ways — read one way, it's true and one way it's false — and the story now reflects that.

Ask Me Another

Amy Sedaris: Etsy Or Smithsonian?

Corrected on April 17, 2017

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly called the Smithsonian American Art Museum the Smithsonian Museum of American Art.

Morning Edition

840 Horsepower And Revving To Go: A 'Last Gasp' For Supercars?

Corrected on April 14, 2017

In the audio of this story, we say the Dodge Demon is the fastest car in production. The Demon has tested fastest on a drag strip. But Tesla's Model S P100D is the current record holder going from 0 to 60 — clocking in at 2.28 seconds.

All Things Considered

Eels May Use 'Magnetic Maps' As They Slither Across The Ocean

Corrected on April 13, 2017

Earlier broadcast and Web versions of this story said eel eggs had never been collected in the wild. University of Tokyo researchers first collected Japanese eel eggs in the wild for a study from 2005 to 2009.

Morning Edition

States Find Other Execution Methods After Difficulties With Lethal Injection

Corrected on April 13, 2017

In the audio of this report, as well as an earlier Web version, we say the Death Penalty Information Center opposes capital punishment. In fact, DPIC has not taken that position. The nonprofit organization is a resource for information about the death penalty.

All Things Considered

New York Approves Reforms To Keep Juvenile Offenders Out Of Adult Prisons

Corrected on April 12, 2017

In this report, we say New York and North Carolina are the only states that prosecute 16- and 17-year-olds as adults. While they are the only states that regularly route 16-year-olds into adult courts and prisons, a total of seven states still try 17-year-olds as adults and in some cases imprison them with adult inmates. Other states try teenagers as adults only in cases involving extreme violence or other aggravating circumstances.

Morning Edition

Chemical Attack And Bombs Kill At Least 58 In Syria

Corrected on April 12, 2017

Medical facilities, including Allied hospital ships, were attacked during World War II. And gas chambers were among the methods used by the Nazis to kill millions of Jews during the war. We should have noted both those facts during this conversation.

All Things Considered

Tracing Gun Violence Through 3 Generations Of A Family

Corrected on April 12, 2017

In an earlier version of this story, a photograph of Luis Gonzalez was incorrectly credited to Rowan Moore Gerety. The photo was taken by Lena Jackson.

All Things Considered

Catholics Build 'Intentional' Community Of Like-Minded Believers

Corrected on April 11, 2017

In an earlier Web version of this story, we said conservative Catholics split their votes about evenly between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. In fact, many non-Trump voters chose third-party candidates, not Clinton.

Riding Hopes For Model 3, Tesla Overtakes Ford In Market Value

Corrected on April 4, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly said in the headline and text that Tesla's market value had surpassed that of General Motors on Tuesday morning. In fact, Tesla came close but did not overtake GM, the most valuable U.S. automaker.

All Things Considered

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

Corrected on April 4, 2017

An earlier Web version of this story misspelled the name of Mexico city's Lagunilla market as Languilla and misspelled quinceañera.

All Things Considered

Candy-Makers Face Pressure For Lobbying The Trump Administration

Corrected on March 31, 2017

During this conversation, Washington Post reporter Amy Brittain says there are regulations in some states that prohibit the use of SNAP program benefits to purchase candy. In fact, while such regulations have been proposed, they have not been put in place.

Morning Edition

SpaceX Reuses A Rocket To Launch A Satellite

Corrected on March 31, 2017

A previous version of this post referred to the College of Engineering and Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. In fact, it is the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

Morning Edition

'Nabokov's Favorite Word Is Mauve' Crunches The (Literary) Numbers

Corrected on March 31, 2017

An earlier version of this post slightly misstated Blatt's finding about adverbs, by concluding "Of [the 37 books generally considered 'Great'], 2 out of 3 — 67 percent — contained a significantly lower number of adverbs (less than 50 per 10,000 words) than occurs, on average, in written English."

The 67 percent figure instead refers to the portion of books by "great authors" that are considered great, and that meet criteria for low-adverb rate stated in the corrected text.

Where Bob Dylan Was While Keeping Silent About His Nobel Prize

Corrected on March 30, 2017

This article originally stated Bob Dylan was on tour in Tulsa the day after the Nobel Prize announcement — it was 10 days after. As well, it stated that Dylan "sent" Patti Smith to accept his prize. In fact, Smith was asked prior to the public announcement of Dylan as its recipient.

All Things Considered

Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

Corrected on March 29, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we mischaracterize the draft executive order that leaked from the White House. The order proposes new limits on the use of public benefits, not by people seeking citizenship, but by people seeking admission into the U.S. and lawful residency.

All Things Considered

GAO Agrees To Review Costs Of Trump's Trips To Mar-A-Lago

Corrected on March 29, 2017

In the audio of this story, the Government Accountability Office is mistakenly called the Government Office of Accountability. In a previous Web version, the GAO was misidentified as the General Accountability Office.

All Things Considered

Older Workers Find Age Discrimination Built Right Into Some Job Websites

Corrected on March 29, 2017

An earlier web version of this story mistakenly indicated that the case that spurred the Illinois attorney general to action involved Monster.com. The case involved ItsMyCareer.com, which dropped its resume-building feature.

Morning Edition

When America Needed Them, 'The Waltons' Were There

Corrected on March 27, 2017

A previous Web introduction incorrectly said the show was based on the creator's early life in a tiny town in North Carolina. It should have said Virginia.

All Things Considered

Financial Woes Place Future Of Sears In Doubt

Corrected on March 27, 2017

In this story, we state that the CEO of Sears Holdings said he has serious doubts the company will survive. While we note that this assessment came from the company in its annual report, we incorrectly attribute the statement to the CEO. We should also note that the annual report detailed steps the company is taking to mitigate the risks.

Social Media, Math And The Mystery Of A Mumps Outbreak

Corrected on March 22, 2017

Clarification: This story was updated on March 31 to include information provided by Dr. Dirk Haselow, the state epidemiologist and outbreak response medical director for the Arkansas Department of Health, about the collection of immunization data in the state.

Previously posted on March 22: A previous version of this story incorrectly said the report in The Lancet Infectious Diseases was published Thursday. It was published Wednesday.

Morning Edition

Former Colleague Says Judge Gorsuch Works Across Party Lines

Corrected on March 22, 2017

After this piece aired, it was brought to our attention that Judge Michael McConnell misremembered the case he mentioned in the interview.

When asked to describe an example of a case where he and Judge Neil Gorsuch disagreed, McConnell mentioned a case involving Denver telecom CEO Joe Nacchio. In fact, Gorsuch had recused himself from that case.

McConnell apologizes for his memory lapse.

All Things Considered

Tomb Of Jesus Is Restored In Jerusalem

Corrected on March 21, 2017

A previous version of this story misspelled Antonia Moropoulou's last name as Moropolou.

Morning Edition

Who Has The Healthiest Hearts In The World?

Corrected on March 21, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the amount of extra sugar the average American eats each day. That amount is 22 teaspoons, not 22 tablespoons.

Leading The Charge Against The GOP Health Plan, Rep. Mark Meadows Is Right At Home

Corrected on March 20, 2017

In an earlier version of this story, Park Ridge Health was incorrectly referred to as a Catholic hospital. It is not. It is part of Adventist Health System, a nonprofit Protestant health care system.

A caption in the story also erroneously identified a dam on Lake Sequoyah as Dry Falls. The falls is actually downstream of the dam.

All Things Considered

Judge Gorsuch's Writings Signal He Would Be A Conservative On Social Issues

Corrected on March 20, 2017

In the audio version of this story, we mistakenly report that Mark Rienzi says the notion of complicity is more important than the rights of employees to have health insurance. Rienzi did not say that. Rienzi does believe there are other ways women can get health coverage for birth control outside of their employer's health plans.

How To Make Farmers Love Cover Crops? Pay Them

Corrected on March 18, 2017

An earlier version of this story stated that Ken Staver believes that cover crops pay for themselves. Some proponents of cover crops believe this, but Staver does not think that there's convincing evidence for this, especially for cover crops that are most effective in preventing nutrient pollution.

Weekend Edition Saturday

The Legacy Of The Mississippi Delta Chinese

Corrected on March 18, 2017

In a previous digital version of this story, Frieda Quon's last name was incorrectly spelled as Kwon.

Also, a quote in the digital version, "The Chinese face with a Southern accent throws people off," was misattributed to Quon. It was actually said by Jean Maskas.

All Things Considered

Live-Action 'Beauty And The Beast ' Revisits A Tale As Old As Time

Corrected on March 17, 2017

Bob Mondello says:

"In describing how the first song in the new Beauty and the Beast differs from the animated version, I made a factual error.

"I played a brief bit of dialogue in which Belle encounters a man on the street — Monsieur Jean — who thinks he has lost something, but can't remember what. And then I said, 'That bit's new, and while it's not important [because] this forgetful guy never reappears, it is helpful[.]'

"That's just wrong. Turns out, I'm the forgetful one. Not only does Monsieur Jean reappear, but his being forgetful in this new bit of dialogue is actually setting up a plot thread that is important. It's part of the 'lots of back story' that I later praise the filmmakers for having concocted.

"It's hard to say more without spoilers, and reviewers aren't supposed to say spoilers. We're also not supposed to say things that would cause millions of 6-year-olds to shout at their radios, 'Nooooo, Silly! That's _________.'

"See? No spoilers. At least I got that part right."

This Week In Race: New Doc, New Pols, New Race Game

Corrected on March 17, 2017

A previous version of this story described Ilhan Omar as the first Somali Muslim elected to Congress. She was elected to Minnesota's state House.

Also, a previous version misstated Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's name as Chimanda Adiche Ngozi.

Morning Edition

Leaked Returns Give Insight Into Trump's Taxes

Corrected on March 15, 2017

In a previous version of this story, David Cay Johnston said President Trump would have paid at a 35 percent tax rate if it wasn't for the lingering effects of negative income from a tax shelter and the alternative minimum tax. In fact, the alternative minimum tax prevented Trump from taking as big a deduction as he otherwise would have been able to do.

As Drug Costs Soar, People Delay Or Skip Cancer Treatments

Corrected on March 15, 2017

A previous version of this story said that the highest-dose version of the drug Keytruda cost $1 million a year. That high-dose version was not approved by the FDA. The dosage currently in use costs $152,400 a year.

All Things Considered

Planned Parenthood Would Lose Millions In Payments Under GOP Health Plan

Corrected on March 14, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the American Health Care Act as the American Health Insurance Act. Additionally, that version referred to a CBO report estimate that the federal government would reduce its payments for reproductive care to Planned Parenthood by $178 million in 2017 under the proposed bill. According to a Planned Parenthood spokesperson, the organization stands to lose about $400 million in Medicaid reimbursements per year, and the CBO estimate did not fully reflect those reimbursements.

We also previously said in the Web version that the National Institute of Family and Life Advocates was involved in lobbying activities. That organization primarily gives legal advice and other support to faith-based pregnancy centers.

Minority Advocacy Groups Feel Left Out Of National Efforts, Funding

Corrected on March 14, 2017

A previous caption for the second image on this page, using information supplied by Getty Images, incorrectly said the vigil was sponsored by the Council on American-Islamic Relations. The vigil was sponsored by South Asian Americans Leading Together.

States Wrestle With Legalizing Payments For Gestational Surrogates

Corrected on March 10, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said a state commission in Minnesota recommended that carriers be able to accept payment. The commission didn't come to a conclusion on the issue. It also said the state bill bars compensation. The bill is silent on compensation.

How America's Idea Of Illegal Immigration Doesn't Always Match Reality

Corrected on March 9, 2017

A previous version of the first chart on this page said that there are 32.5 million naturalized citizens in the U.S. There are 19 million, according to the Pew Research Center. (There are 32.5 million lawful immigrants, a number which includes naturalized citizens, green card holders and visa holders.)

Morning Edition

Female Workers Asked To Join In 'A Day Without A Woman' Protests

Corrected on March 8, 2017

In the audio of this story, we say there were more than 1 million demonstrators in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21. In fact, city officials and researchers have said the crowd size was less than that — perhaps 500,000 to 750,000.

All Things Considered

How Do Americans Feel About The Courts? Let Hollywood Be The Judge

Corrected on March 8, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly quoted Groucho Marx in Duck Soup as saying "12 years at Leavenworth, or 11 years at Twelveworth." The correct line is: "10 years in Leavenworth or 11 years in Twelveworth."

Morning Edition

Kona Beer's Name Causes Something Of A Brouhaha

Corrected on March 8, 2017

A previous version of the headline stated that despite the name, Kona Brewing isn't in Hawaii. While not all of Kona's beer is brewed in Hawaii, the company notes that its flagship brewhouse is in Kailua-Kona on Hawaii's Big Island.

All Things Considered

New FCC Chairman Moves Quickly To Reverse Obama Policies

Corrected on March 8, 2017

This story says the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, has dropped efforts to cap rates for prison calls. To clarify: While it is not defending that rate cap for in-state prison calls, it continues to support them for calls between states.

All Things Considered

For Barcelona, Tourism Boom Comes At High Cost

Corrected on March 6, 2017

An earlier Web version of this story said Barcelona Deputy Mayor Janet Sanz estimates there are 10 million licensed, short-term rental flats in the city and about 7 million illegal ones. The correct figures are 10,000 licensed, short-term rental flats and 7,000 illegal ones.

Trump Skips Gridiron Dinner As His Staffers Get Roasted

Corrected on March 5, 2017

A previous version of this story misidentified Elaine Chao as labor secretary. She is the transportation secretary.

Also in a previous version, "The Liberal Old Lady From Academia" was said to be a parody of a Beach Boys hit. While the Beach Boys did record "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena," that song was a hit for Jan & Dean.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sickened Russian Opposition Leader Blames Poison Ordered By Russian Special Services

Corrected on March 4, 2017

An earlier version of the headline for this story stated that Kara-Murza blamed the Kremlin for ordering his poisoning. In fact, as he is quoted as saying in the story, he believes he was poisoned by people who have been or are connected with the Russian special services.

China Describes Its Vision Of Government-Controlled Internet

Corrected on March 2, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the U.S. government officially handed over oversight responsibilities for Internet domains in 2015. In fact, the U.S. government announced the change in 2015 and officially handed over the responsibilities in 2016.

WHO's First-Ever List Of The Dirty Dozen Superbugs

Corrected on March 1, 2017

A previous version of this post stated that a "flu bug" was included in the medium category. The bacteria in question are Haemophilus influenzae, which can cause a wide range of infections, particularly in children, but do not cause flu.

Lawsuit Brings Fresh Scrutiny To Milwaukee's Troubles With Race And Policing

Corrected on March 1, 2017

An earlier version of this story said that Nusrat Choudhury, a lawyer for the ACLU, said that police records show that few police stops ended in frisks. In fact, Choudhury said that few police records the ACLU examined indicate whether a frisk occurred following a police stop, much less whether there was any basis for a frisk.

Morning Edition

With Republicans In Charge, Democrats Plan To Redefine Their Mission

Corrected on February 28, 2017

An earlier version of this Web story incorrectly identified the seats picked up in the Kansas state Legislature as moderate Republicans, not Democrats. Also, during the conversation, DNC Chair Tom Perez said Democrats netted 14 seats in the Kansas Legislature. In fact, the correct number is 12.

All Things Considered

Week In Politics: Trump's Speech At CPAC, Race For DNC Chair

Corrected on February 27, 2017

David Brooks notes that some CPAC attendees were waving Russian flags. That did happen. But it should not be inferred that those people were expressing support for Russia or its president, Vladimir Putin. The flags were distributed by political pranksters, and many were confiscated by CPAC staff.

Morning Edition

How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

Corrected on February 27, 2017

A previous Web version of this story quoted Trevor Timm as saying a record number of journalists had been prosecuted over the past eight to 10 years. Timm subsequently informed us that he had misspoken and had meant to say a record number of sources.

When You Love An Old Dog, Managing Care Can Be A Challenge

Corrected on February 25, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly suggested some dogs may be able to take ibuprofen. Dogs should not be given pain medication made for humans. Canine-specific pain medication can be given with the supervision of a veterinarian.

All Things Considered

Landowners Likely To Bring More Lawsuits As Trump Moves On Border Wall

Corrected on February 24, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Eloisa Tamez is a professor at the University of Texas, Brownsville. She is actually at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley.

Morning Edition

White House Orders The Hiring Of 15,000 New Immigration Agents

Corrected on February 22, 2017

A previous headline on this story said the White House ordered the hiring of 15,000 new border agents. The order is for the hiring of 5,000 new Border Patrol agents and 10,000 new Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, who work in the interior of the country.

Morning Edition

Muslim Brotherhood, Mainstream In Many Countries, May Be Listed As Terrorist Group

Corrected on February 22, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Egyptians elected a Muslim Brotherhood president six years after the fall of Hosni Mubarak. The election took place in 2012, a year after Mubarak's fall. The audio version of the story incorrectly states that the 2012 election took place six years ago; it has been five years.

The Other WWII American-Internment Atrocity

Corrected on February 22, 2017

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that President Reagan had signed the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians Act in 1980. He actually signed it in 1988.

Crop-Protecting Fungicides May Be Hurting The Honey Bees

Corrected on February 22, 2017

An earlier version of this story didn't accurately depict the degree of regulation imposed on fungicides in many states, including Washington. In Washington and many other states, fungicides are not addressed by pollinator protection guidelines, which focus on other types of pesticides.

Record Number Of Miles Driven In U.S. Last Year

Corrected on February 21, 2017

A previous version of this story referred to the gas tax having remained at 18.4 percent a gallon since 1993. The story now makes clear that figure refers to the federal gas tax.

Can Changing When And What We Eat Help Outwit Disease?

Corrected on February 21, 2017

A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to irritable bowel syndrome as an autoimmune disease. The correct term is inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's.

A previous photo caption associated with this story that appeared on the NPR.org home page incorrectly spelled Brandie Jefferson's first name as Brandi.

Trump's Thursday Press Conference, Annotated

Corrected on February 17, 2017

A previous version of an annotation about businesses investing in the U.S. said Ford decided to invest $700 billion to expand its Michigan plant. It actually decided to invest $700 million.

'A Day Without Immigrants' Promises A National Strike Thursday

Corrected on February 16, 2017

In an earlier version of this story, reporter Danielle Karson cited LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis saying immigrants contributed $300 billion a year in tax revenue, rather than to the GDP of L.A. County. We've clarified that point in the quote from Karson's report.

Does Science Know Right From Wrong?

Corrected on February 16, 2017

An earlier version of this 13.7 post stated that Vannevar Bush's July 1945 report went to President Roosevelt. While the report had been requested by Roosevelt in 1944, it wasn't finished until after his death, so it went to President Truman.

5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News

Corrected on February 16, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the school where Todd Flory teaches. It is Wheatland Elementary School in Wichita, Kan., not Calamus Wheatland Elementary School in Calamus, Iowa.

All Things Considered

Rollout Of Chevy Bolt May Mark Turning Point For Electric Car Market

Corrected on February 14, 2017

In the radio version of this story, we describe the Chevy Volt as a plug-in hybrid car that can run on gas when the battery is empty. To be more precise, when the battery is low on electric charge, the Volt switches to a gas-powered generator for the battery.

Morning Edition

Stonewall Riots Grab The Spotlight From Black Cat Protests

Corrected on February 13, 2017

In this story, as in a previous Web introduction, we say that the 1967 protest at the Black Cat tavern in Los Angeles was the country's first organized LGBT demonstration. In fact, there had been earlier protests in the U.S., including the first "Annual Reminder" demonstration in Philadelphia in 1965.

Did Betsy DeVos Make You Want To Run For School Board?

Corrected on February 12, 2017

An earlier version of this story, and the headline, implied that Victoria Sterling is running for school board in Jefferson City, Mo., because of the national controversy over Betsy DeVos. Sterling says that it was concerns about local education issues that inspired her candidacy.

Can We Trust Science?

Corrected on February 12, 2017

An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that Walter Freeman won the Nobel Prize. It was Freeman's mentor, Egas Moniz, who won the prize.

Morning Edition

Broadcasting Board of Governors' Chief On The Future Of VOA

Corrected on February 10, 2017

A previous Web version of this story called John Lansing the Voice of America chief. Lansing is the head of the Broadcasting Board of Governors. It also called the group a governing body. It is an independent agency.

Morning Edition

A Romance That Began With A Mistake

Corrected on February 10, 2017

A previous Web version of this story said the Dewanes were married after about three months of dating. They were engaged after about three months.

How Betsy DeVos Became Trump's Least Popular Cabinet Pick

Corrected on February 3, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Broad Foundation had taken a position against Betsy DeVos. Because of its tax-exempt status, the foundation cannot engage in political activity.

Morning Edition

Threat Of Rain Doesn't Deter Crowds From National Mall

Corrected on February 2, 2017

A previous Web introduction to this story misspelled Audie Cornish's first name as Audio. Additionally, a previous version of the transcript misspelled Cory Turner's first name as Corey.

Fresh Air

Writer Bharati Mukherjee

Corrected on February 1, 2017

A previous headline and story misspelled Bharati Mukherjee's name as Bharti.

Morning Edition

Trump's Immigration Order Is 'Un-American,' Rep. Carson Says

Corrected on January 31, 2017

Following the broadcast of this report, Carson's office sent NPR the following statement about his comment regarding racial supremacist groups:

"This assertion was not based on a single statistic or on relative terror threat, but rather an assessment of the current environment. The congressman believes that when looking at relative membership numbers, hateful rhetoric, racially based hate crimes, and fatalities by right-wing organizations, it paints a picture of a larger threat to the safety of Americans and society as a whole. New America has an assessment of deaths from far right wing vs. violent jihadist terrorism. The FBI reported that in 2014, 47% of hate crimes were racially motivated. And the white supremacist group Stormfront has claimed additional interest in their content on the back of Donald Trump's recent comments. Additionally, it is important to remember that many attacks are inspired by an ideology rather than directed by an organization. Just as [the Islamic State] bears responsibility for lone wolf attacks in the United States, so do racial supremacist groups who inspire hate crimes. Taken together, he believes it is reasonable to say that the racial supremacist groups pose a more significant threat."

Trump Set To Announce Supreme Court Nominee

Corrected on January 31, 2017

In a previous version of this story, we said Judge Pryor sits on a federal appeals court based in New Orleans. In fact, Judge Pryor's court is based in Atlanta.

All Things Considered

Attention Must Be Paid To What 'The Salesman' Is Selling

Corrected on January 31, 2017

The scene depicted in the photograph is from the movie The Salesman. A previous caption incorrectly referred to a different Asghar Farhadi movie, A Separation.

Morning Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

Corrected on January 29, 2017

Work on the project was done at the University of California, San Diego and not the University of California, Davis as was previously stated in this story. Additionally, Joseph Wang is the chair of nanoengineering at UCSD, not UC Davis.

The Trump Foreign Policy Doctrine — In 3 Points

Corrected on January 26, 2017

A chart showing military spending by NATO countries has been removed from this page because of inaccuracies in the figures given for many of those nations. Data on the defense spending of NATO countries are available here.

Fact Check: Has President Obama 'Depleted' The Military?

Corrected on January 26, 2017

A chart showing military spending by NATO countries has been removed from this page because of inaccuracies in the figures given for many of those nations. Data on the defense spending of NATO countries are available here.

'Like High-Definition From The Heavens'; NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth

Corrected on January 24, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the GOES-16 is named, in part, after its imaging device, which measures 16 spectral bands. In fact, it is the 16th in a series of NOAA satellites.

In addition, the story said the GOES-16 launched in December 2016. It launched in November of that year.

Morning Edition

Southern Border Wall: Campaign Slogan Meets Reality

Corrected on January 24, 2017

In the audio, the following quote should have been attributed to Border Patrol spokesman Joshua Devack, not agent James Nielsen: "At the time that this fence was built, it was too expensive to continue. And there's also this natural barrier here that a lot of crossers choose not to climb this mountain. They prefer to have easier access to roads and civilization."

Trump Signs Executive Order To 'Ease The Burdens Of Obamacare'

Corrected on January 20, 2017

A previous version of this story implied that the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. had been removed from the Oval Office. It turns out that the bust is still there and had just been obscured from the sight of the pool reporter by a door and an agent.

Ask Me Another

Eugene Mirman: Burger On A Sesame Seed Pun

Corrected on January 20, 2017

During Eugene Mirman's quiz, the city of Johannesburg was incorrectly identified as one of South Africa's three capitals, alongside Pretoria and Cape Town. The judicial capital of South Africa is Bloemfontein.

Scientists Needn't Get A Patient's Consent To Study Blood Or DNA

Corrected on January 19, 2017

An earlier version of this story suggested that the revised Common Rule will allow multi-institution studies on humans to be governed by a single, central oversight committee. In fact, the revised rule requires such studies to rely on a central oversight committee, with certain exceptions. Also, to clarify, the Common Rule applies to federally funded research on human subjects, not just federally funded medical research.

All Things Considered

Deferred Action: A Bird In Hand For Young Immigrants

Corrected on January 19, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly describe the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as resulting from an executive order. It was actually created through executive action.

All Things Considered

Some North Carolinians Expect A Struggle Under Trump Administration

Corrected on January 17, 2017

In this story, we say Donald Trump received 85 percent of the vote in North Carolina's Yadkin County. That was a preliminary estimate. In fact, Trump received 78.8 percent of the vote in Yadkin County, which was a tie with Graham County for the highest vote percentage in the state.

All Things Considered

How A Grieving Father Created The Model For Anti-Terror Lawsuits

Corrected on January 13, 2017

A previous version of the transcript included a typographical error. Iran did not make a down payment for weapons of about $400 billion. The down payment was about $400 million. The figure is correct in the audio.

Morning Edition

New Ghanaian President's Speech Sounds Familiar

Corrected on January 10, 2017

A previous version of this story, including the headline, incorrectly said that the communications director for Ghana's president had been fired from his job.

Morning Edition

Trump Business Deals In Southeast Asia Raise Conflict Of Interest Concerns

Corrected on January 6, 2017

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that Indonesian politician Setya Novanto was a business partner of President-elect Donald Trump. In fact it was Trump's Indonesian business partner who arranged for Novanto and Trump to meet.

Morning Edition

Gun Deaths In Chicago Reach Startling Number As Year Closes

Corrected on January 6, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Laquan McDonald was unarmed. In fact, he was carrying a knife.

Previously posted Dec. 28, 2016: A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that in September Chicago had surpassed last year's total of about 740 killings. The correct number is 470.

All Things Considered

When Tech Workers Arrive On Visa, What About Their Spouses?

Corrected on January 6, 2017

A previous caption incorrectly named the organization Child Rights and You as Children's Rights and You. It also incorrectly described CRY as an Indian organization. While CRY does conduct child development projects in India, it also does the same in the U.S. and is based in Braintree, Mass.

Merry Prankster In LA Wants To Start 2017 On A High Note

Corrected on January 3, 2017

A previous version of this story referred to California's Proposition 64 as legalizing recreational use of marijuana beginning in 2018. In fact, recreational use became legal when voters approved the measure in November; the state has until Jan. 1, 2018, to begin issuing licenses to sell marijuana.