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What You Should Know About The U.S. In Niger

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Syrian Brig. Gen. Issam Zahreddine (right) speaks with a civilian in the eastern city of Deir Ezzor in September, during the offensive against ISIS militants. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yu Zu'en stands in front of one of the few wall decorations in his new, government-issued apartment: a poster of China's leaders. The 84-year-old veteran lost his right eye fighting the Americans in Korea in 1951. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Xi Jinping's War On Poverty Moves Millions Of Chinese Off The Farm

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Brazil's Olympic Committee chief, Carlos Nuzman, resigned from his post after being arrested on Oct. 5. He's seen here coming to the Brazilian Federal Police building in Rio de Janeiro for questioning on Sept. 5. Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Canadian Man Sues Low-Cost Sunwing Airlines Over Beverage Service

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Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (center) waves to his Pakistan Muslim League supporters during a party general council meeting in Islamabad this month. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Spain Moves To Strip Catalonia's Regional Autonomy

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Opposition Movement Struggles To Unseat Venezuela's President

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North Korea's Cut From Small Businesses Goes To Its Nuclear Program

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Catalan regional President Carles Puigdemont addresses the media after a ceremony commemorating the 77th anniversary of the death of Catalan leader Lluis Companys at the Montjuic Cemetery in Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Indonesian soldiers stand guard over members of the youth wing of the Indonesian Communist Party, who were packed into a truck to be taken to a Jakarta prison in October 1965. Over the next few months, the government's military leadership carried out the systematic execution of hundreds of thousands of people. /AP hide caption

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How Other Terrorist Organizations Could Benefit From ISIS' Loss Of Raqqa

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Kenyan Officials Say They Can't Guarantee Fair Process In Presidential Election

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Chinese President Xi Jinping has cracked down on corruption — and dissent. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

For Clues To China's Crackdown On Public Expression, Look To Its Economy

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Rasika chef Vikram Sunderam, here with a towering dish of eggplant and potato, says, "Indian cuisine is a very personal cuisine. It's made from family to family, how they like to cook." Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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In New Cookbook, Acclaimed Indian Restaurant Finally Spills Its Secrets

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Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Wednesday at the opening session of the 19th national congress of China's ruling Communist Party at The Great Hall Of The People in Beijing. The congress takes place every five years. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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China's President Xi Jinping gives a speech at the opening session of the Chinese Communist Party Congress on Wednesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images