Daniel Fishel for NPR

Eating Chocolate, A Little Each Week, May Lower The Risk Of A Heart Flutter

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Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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A groundskeeper at Pinecrest Gardens sprays pesticide to kill mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County, Fla., in 2016. Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Susan Morgan, age 5, holds a bunch of bananas in Ponchatoula, La., in 1955. Susan was diagnosed with celiac disease and was prescribed a diet of 200 bananas weekly. AP hide caption

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AP

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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Modern psychology shows that we all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. Most of us like people who remind us of ourselves — whether that is someone else with the same name or the same birthday. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

International Eel Smuggling Scheme Centers On Maine

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John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

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For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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KathyDewar/Getty Images

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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A ladybug unfolds its wings. Scientists have had trouble figuring out how ladybugs fold their wings back up — but a team in Japan found a way to see the process. University of Tokyo/PNAS hide caption

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University of Tokyo/PNAS

A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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